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Cardi B Is the Queen of Handling Really Awkward Interviews

She's ridden out weird chats with Tim Westwood, and now Wendy Williams, with an impressive, witch-like zen.

She's ridden out weird chats with Tim Westwood, and now Wendy Williams, with an impressive, witch-like zen.

Lauren O'Neill

Cardi B, quite clearly, was born to be famous. Anyone with sense knew this as soon as they saw her now-legendary "a hoe never gets cold" Vine, (and then replayed it approximately seventeen times in a row), magnetized by the sheer presence she manages to display in a clip that lasts five seconds. And when we fast forward to right now, it's pretty clear that she's a self-starter in the vein of some of the world's most famous women (the Kardashians, Amber Rose): she turned social media fame into a spot on Love and Hip Hop New York, before quitting to focus on becoming a full-time musician. In case you needed telling twice, she's got star power in spades.

And an important part of being a famous person in the way that Cardi B is a famous person (i.e. a reality star so often put into the "famous for doing nothing" camp) is navigating awkward interviews, either with people who think you haven't earned your place, or who don't care what you have to say. Cardi, as a natural pro, has shown herself to be a dab hand at this, too, most recently on The Wendy Williams Show.

Appearing on the show yesterday, she gave a performance of her track "Bodak Yellow" (see it above! It's really great! Because Cardi B is a dope rapper!) before being interviewed by Williams who basically seemed to treat her like a silly novelty in that way that people tend to with Cardi B. Admirably, however, she held her own, coming out best in the interview, in the same way she did in the below car crash of an interview which took place in April this year (content warning: Tim Westwood says the word "thotty" within the first minute):

I am really sorry for sharing this (if you made it past five minutes let me know and I'll try to arrange you a prize and/or doctor's appointment for your inevitable violent nausea) but the point I am trying to get across is: look how insulting, objectifying and straight up gross Westwood is being, and look how Cardi deals with it. She'd have been within her rights to get up and leave after approximately two minutes, but she's polite—if slightly confused—and does her job with humour and wit, because she's a pro.

Cardi B, basically, is a gift. More interviewers should recognize her as such, because she's going to be around for a very long time.

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