This Guy Selling the Cars Biggie and Tupac Were Shot In Sucks

Gary Zimet is selling the cars Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac were killed in and it's as tasteless as it sounds.

Kristin Corry

Biggie Photo by Al Pereira/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images, Tupac Photo by Steve Granitz Archive/WireImage

Tomorrow marks 21 years since the death of the Notorious B.I.G., which means that the corporate vultures who profit off the tragic deaths of young celebrities are circling again. There's a USA docu-series underway, revisiting both his and Tupac's deaths. And if that weren't enough, there's a guy who's now attempting to sell both of the cars they were shot in. Today, Pitchfork interviewed Gary Zimet, founder of Moments in Time, a business that possess its share of morbid memorabilia and is now in the process of seeking buyers for the two vehicles.

The GMC Suburban SUV Biggie was shot in is reportedly going for $750,000, while the BMW 7 Series Tupac was shot in is being auctioned on for $1.5 million. In the interview with Pitchfork, Zimet argues for the vehicles' cultural significance, saying he'd sell them museums, but hasn't found one yet because they're "perpetually broke."

"Both these cars are of historical significance," he says. "You really have to look at this from a historical angle. If the car JFK got killed in ever went up for sale—and, unfortunately, it never will—it would bring in a minimum of $25 million."

Zimet seems like a self-professed history buff, comparing the vehicles to documents like a copy of the 13th Amendment he obtained and later sold. But not to worry, Zimet doesn't think this is a way to exploit the deaths of two of hip-hops most profound rappers, or anything. "The fact these were cars that someone died in appeals to people," he says. "There is a curiosity there. Is it slightly morbid? Absolutely! Am I exploiting the families [of Biggie and Tupac]? Absolutely… not!"

The whole situation is stomach turning. Zimet acquiring the vehicles for history's sake is one thing, but seeing another person profiting off Tupac and Biggie's death is hard to watch. In the interview, Zimet contradicts himself, comparing the vehicles to JFK's assassination, but pointing out that the former president's vehicle would never be for sale. That's about the only thing he gets right here, JFK's car would never be for sale, because Tupac and Biggie don't have the structures in place for people to protect them in the way the fallen president does. Pop culture never lets the dead rest which is why a 64-year-old man can stand to make over a million dollars on the premature deaths of two famed rappers.

Kristin Corry is a staff writer for Noisey. Follow her on Twitter.