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Forget Netflix, Super Bwe and Mick Jenkins Have Another Plan and It's Called "Breakfast & Chill"

The Chicago rappers connect for a smooth song about missing someone at home from the road.

Tara Mahadevan


Super Bwe / Photo by Rena Naltsas

Although he’s got a solid ten years of rapping under his belt, earning respect in his city and surrounding cities in the Midwest, it wasn’t until the last few years that Chicago rapper Supa Bwe started getting the limelight he deserved. Part of that new visibility had to do with his creation of the explosive rap trio Hurt Everybody—with producer Mulatto Beats and rapper Qari—which found him a younger audience. But another part of it is he isn’t afraid to release music often, demonstrating an excitement for experimentation that is true to himself.

“I got so many flavors—I’m not afraid to show my growth,” he shares. “I might feel something today that I won’t feel tomorrow, and I know that.”

Hurt Everybody dropped three projects before recently breaking up. As a soloist, Supa Bwe has released quite a few others, including the recent Magic City and The Dead Occasion. Now he’s preparing the forthcoming Down Comes the Spaceman EP. Hurt Everybody’s dissolution brought even more clarity to the fact that this process is about development; Supa isn’t averse to trial and error.

But with his latest cut “Breakfast & Chill,” featuring fellow Chicago rapper Mick Jenkins, Supa Bwe slides into his familiar style of slow, strained crooning, matching the song’s rhythm and sparse, subdued beat. “I know that I’m late calling back, but I’m calling back,” he sings, asking “can I come over / can I come crash?” That’s the first two-thirds of the song; then Jenkins appears, his deeper voice corresponding with Supa’s flow but his cadence coming across a bit quicker, showing how distinctive the two artists are from each other.

“It’s a song about being on the road and missing someone at home,” Supa Bwe says. Simple as that.

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