Noisey Blog

Rush Vs. Rush

Por Sasha Hecht

0

Why do politicians insist on using artists' work without permission? It's getting ridiculous at this point, some death drive stuff is going on.

Rush Limbaugh recently called Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke a slut because she wanted her school health insurance to pay for contraception. A lot of us responded by smashing our faces into the nearest wall. But if you were able to make it through Limbaugh's demand for Fluke's alleged "sex tape," you might have heard some bangin' Canadian prog. Check it out:

That track under Limbaugh's speech is by Rush. The band, not the dickhead. This song is called "The Spirit of Radio."

If you're shocked that the luminary Canadian prog rockers would allow their tune to be used in this way, you weren't the only ones. As it turns out, Limbaugh has been using aforementioned track, as well as their song "Bravado," for years without Rush's knowledge or consent. Keep in mind that the band has been involved in numerous philanthropic human rights campaigns over the course of their career. Rightfully assuming that something must be off, Bob Cesca contacted the band and their long-time label, Anthem Entertainment, in order to alert them to Limbaugh's unlicensed, unapproved exploitation of their music. A cease and desist was immediately sent to Limbaugh and his camp. Check out the document:

Ladies & Gentlemen:

I am the attorney for Rush, their management company, S.R.O. Management Inc., their music publishing company, Core Music Publishing and their record company, The Anthem Entertainment Group Inc.

According to media reports, Rush Limbaugh, Premiere Radio Networks and The Rush Limbaugh Show have been using Rush’s recorded music as part of what is essentially a political broadcast.

The use of Rush’s music in this way is an infringement of Rush’s copyrights and trademarks. The public performance of Rush’s music is not licensed for political purposes and any such use is in breach of public performance licenses and constitutes copyright infringement. There are civil and criminal remedies for copyright infringement, including statutory damages and fines.

(see sections 501-513 of Title 17 of the United States Code)

In addition, the use of Rush’s music in this manner implies an endorsement of the views expressed and products advertised on the show, and is in breach of not only copyright and trademark rights, but also, of section 51 of the New York Civil Rights Law (excerpt attached).

Accordingly, we hereby demand that you immediately stop all use of Rush’s music and confirm that you will do so.

Here's a new development: Genesis' Peter Gabriel just came forward to publicly denounced Limbaugh for ganking his music

After catching word that his song "Sledgehammer" was used on the Limbaugh's show, Gabriel's reps took to his Facebook page to assert that he was "appalled to learn that his music was linked to Rush Limbaugh's extraordinary attack," later adding a direct quote from Gabriel himself:

"‎I am a real believer in the Freedom of Speech and would defend Rush Limbaugh’s right to mouth off about almost anything. I just don’t like my work being used as the bed track for prejudice or hatred."

 

The real takeaway is that Limbaugh loves 19080s prog, but that the left-leaning sissies won't let him pillage their discographies. If Rush is looking for free music in the name of hate-mongering, he should hit up Skrewdriver or something.

 

@sashahecht

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